Killer too high risk to be freed

Last updated 05:00 24/07/2013

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A Timaru man convicted of manslaughter has again been declined parole.

John Oliver Jamieson, 25, was one of six men found guilty of the manslaughter of Wayne Bray in February 2008. The other five have been freed from prison on parole.

Jamieson has completed the Special Treatment Unit Rehabilitation Programme which aims to help serious violent offenders with a high risk of reoffending.

An alcohol and drugs advisory service report, provided to the Parole Board at his recent hearing, said Jamieson did not require fulltime residential treatment, but non-residential treatment was available to him.

The specialist report indicated Jamieson still needed to demonstrate he could put into action the skills he had learnt.

"It is rather disappointing to see that there was a recent misconduct and he has been declined the ability to go to the self-care villas."

The board, in favour of Jamieson being tested in an environment such as Release to Work, noted he was now at an age where that should be possible subject to his reclassification.

"The board strongly supports him being able to move forward with this sentence to a position where he can be tested, preferably outside the wire by the use of the Release to Work provisions."

While the board accepted Jamieson and his family believed he had changed, it noted a long history of disobedience and problems with his behaviour. Jamieson needed to clearly demonstrate to the board that he was able to use the skills he had acquired on programmes to avoid further offending and not be involved in further misconduct in prison.

"We note that he still has three years at least to run on the sentence at this stage and, having regard to his high-risk rating, the board have not been taking to the view that the simple completion of the programme is enough at this point to demonstrate that he has reduced his risk to a level where he would not be considered an undue risk to the safety of the community. For those reasons, parole is declined."

Jamieson will be seen by the board again in a year's time.

Daniel Raymond Kreegher, the sixth person convicted of Mr Bray's manslaughter, was freed from prison in January. He was sentenced to seven years and eight months in prison. The parole board saw him for a progress hearing last month.

"We have a report from Mr Kreegher's probation officer, which in essence indicates that Mr Kreegher has done everything required of him to date and has done it satisfactorily. That is pleasing to hear and, in the circumstances, we do not consider there is a need to see him further. He is well aware but we have reminded him that he has still about three years to complete the whole sentence and we know he is on conditions and parole until 7 July, 2016."

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- The Timaru Herald

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