Abused cabbie 'unprofessional'

Last updated 05:00 30/07/2013
Paul Cardoso
NO SYMPATHY: Blue Star cabbie Paul Cardoso believes the cab driver who filmed a customer abusing him acted in an unprofessional way.

Relevant offers


Marlborough man charged with indecent assault and sexual violation Angry ex partner harrassed woman with texts and social media, court told Marlborough police statistics show increasing drug use and supply offences Palmerston North mail sorter stole parcels to sell for drugs Son's kidnapping inspires fresh start for meth addict Former friend's burglary 'disrespected' late mother's memory, says victim Baby shaker gets rev-up from judge at sentencing Trial for three men, two youths charged with murdering Craig Rippon begins Conviction over false rape complaint following sex with minor Fear NZ methamphetamine problem could worsen amid worldwide glut

A man accused of racially abusing a Pakistani-born taxi driver in Invercargill has received support from an unlikely source - another cabbie.

Invercargill man Gregory Shuttleworth subjected Invercargill Taxis driver Tariq Humayun to a torrent of racial abuse that was captured on video and has gone viral.

However, Paul Cardoso, a Portuguese-born cabbie who is a shareholder and driver for Invercargill company Blue Star Taxis, says the remarks made by Mr Humayun and the act of filming the incident on his iPhone were unprofessional.

He said he believed Mr Humayun may have instigated the incident by his actions.

"The issue was a result of poor professional standards by inexperienced drivers in the service industry," he said.

"As a driver, it is my job to get people home safely, not to provoke a racial outburst as this driver did. Such statements as ‘are you drunk sir' and ‘put your seatbelt on' will always create conflict when alcohol is involved."

The veteran taxi driver said no-one should be subjected to racial abuse but he did not believe a professional taxi driver should be video recording a customer on a device that was not a company-installed camera.

The incident was an embarrassment to the taxi industry, he said.

Mr Cardoso said he was also an immigrant cabbie who moved to New Zealand from Portugal and during his 18 years as a taxi driver in Invercargill had never been on the receiving end of any racial tirades.

Invercargill Taxis director Safinah Mohammed defended Mr Humayun yesterday.

She said her driver behaved in a "very professional" manner under difficult circumstances.

"He felt unsafe and was all alone in a very rural part of Invercargill. He warned the passenger he was being filmed," she said.

The driver was entitled to ask the passenger to put his seatbelt on because he was moving around, she said. The company's No 1 priority was the safety of its drivers, she said.

Ms Mohammed declined to comment on whether it was appropriate for a taxi driver to film a fare on a personal camera.

New Zealand Taxi Federation spokesman John Hart said Invercargill Taxis was not a member of the federation but it was of concern that a taxi driver recorded a customer with his own device. The federation had strict guidelines that only official footage from a company security camera should be used to deal with complaints and incidents.

Ad Feedback

The release of footage was controlled by laws under the New Zealand Land Transport Act.

The appropriate way to deal with any incidents inside a taxi was to report it to the manager who then could pass footage on to police, Mr Hart said.

Passengers were required by law to wear seatbelts but taxi drivers were not responsible for enforcing the law for adults.

Seatbelts on children under 15 years old were the responsibility of the driver.

- The Southland Times


Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content