Meth-using police prosecutor fined $450

IAN STEWARD
Last updated 15:36 15/01/2014

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A police prosecutor used methamphetamine at sex parties, blogged about it, and posted videos of himself injecting the drug on the internet.

Brent William Thompson, 49, worked as a prosecutor in the Auckland District Court while based at Auckland Central Police Station.

He appeared in the Waitakere District Court today for sentencing after pleading guilty to possessing and using methamphetamine and using cannabis.

Judge Heemi Taumanu said Thompson was discovered after anonymous letters were sent to the police minister, the commissioner of police and the Independent Police Conduct Authority.

The letters said Thompson had uploaded videos of himself using drugs to the internet.

Police found blogs Thompson had written describing using the drugs at sex parties in April and May 2013.

Under the title of "Slamming", Thompson was depicted in videos injecting methamphetamine, once alone and once with another man. 

Police found text messages he had sent about buying methamphetamine and they located numerous syringes and a quantity of the drug at his west Auckland house.

Thompson admitted using the drug once a week since January 2013.

He appeared in court in October and pleaded guilty at the first opportunity.

Thompson sought a discharge without conviction, which was opposed by the police.

Police opposed the discharge due to the seriousness of the crime and the lack of supporting evidence in relation to rehabilitation. Police held "grave concerns" in relation to the oversight of rehabilitation.

Defence lawyer Mark Manhire said his client admitted his offending was "hypocrisy", particularly given his involvement with the Alcohol and Other Drugs Court.

Manhire said Thompson had not used drugs during the day while at work and he never used police computers to further his crimes.

"He was a talented prosecutor. He was admired by many." 

Thompson had made honest admissions since the moment he was arrested and gone to great lengths to get help with his drug use. He had undertaken psychotherapy and had sought entry into the Higher Ground live-in drug rehabilitation facility. He had also attended Narcotics Anonymous meetings every day for 78 days, Manhire said.

Police submissions to the court referred to the previous cases of Timothy Sarah and Emily Toner, both prosecutors who became involved with drugs.

Sarah, also a prosecutor at Auckland District, sold methamphetamine and accessed the police computer to pass information to his drug associates.

Toner, a Crown prosecutor, shoplifted during a court break and used drugs while her case was going through a Lawyers and Conveyancers Disciplinary Tribunal.

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Manhire rejected the comparison saying the only common thread was that they were all prosecutors.  

Judge Taumanu declined the discharge without conviction but said he had been persuaded that the case was a "tragedy" that did not require a "substantially punitive outcome".

Thompson was convicted and fined $450.

- Fairfax Media

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