Child porn offences kept from employer

DAVID CLARKSON
Last updated 09:20 07/03/2014

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Name suppression has been granted to protect the chances for rehabilitation and forming "appropriate adult relationships" for a repeat viewer of child abuse pornography.

Probation has even been forbidden to contact the 36-year-old Christchurch man's current employer in case the inquiry leads to him losing his job.

Probation would normally ensure that his job - he's on a 90-day probationary period at the moment - does not bring him into contact with children, and doesn't give him access to the internet.

Christchurch District Court Judge Jane Farish said she would view it as contempt of court if probation did contact the employer. She was concerned that probation would label him as a sex offender, when he had never abused children.

"He has used child pornography because of difficulties having adult relationships," said the judge.

If probation found that there were problems with management of the eight-month home detention sentence she imposed, they should refer the case back to her. She will regularly monitor the man's progress.

He will continue with psychological counselling that he has already started. It will be paid for by his parents because probation has no money available for it. The man will live at his parents' home while serving home detention. The house has no internet access.

A few years ago, the man had received a jail term for possession of a large number of child pornography images, making objectionable publications, and sharing material.

Crown prosecutor Sara Jamieson said the man had begun accessing child pornography within a month of being released from prison. He was seen as a high risk of reoffending.

Judge Farish said he had continued to view child pornography throughout the period when he was attending a Stop rehabilitation programme for sex offenders.

The images showed boys and young men. A small number of images showed toddlers being sexually abused.

The man had now been diagnosed as having social anxiety, the judge said. His rehabilitation on home detention would require approved outings so that he could socialise at visits to a cafe where he could meet people. He needed to be able to form appropriate and sexual adult relationships.

A safety plan and a plan to prevent relapse would need to be developed as part of his home detention sentence.

Judge Farish told the man his offending involved real people, and his interest or desire for the material helped to create a market - "which means more and more of these young people are sexually abused".

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"Sexual abuse is an insidious and hateful crime which is to be denounced and deterred," she said.

Defence counsel James Rapley raised the question of suppression in view of the rehabilitative nature of the sentence imposed - home detention, followed by 12 months of special conditions. It meant the man would be under oversight and supervision for a total of 20 months.

Judge Farish decided to grant interim name suppression, which will finally be decided at another session on April 16. She would consider if suppression could be granted because of the effect that publication would have on his rehabilitation prospects.

- The Press

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