Teacher deregistered for helping cheats

Last updated 13:04 05/06/2014

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A teacher who helped his pupils to cheat in their assessments has been censured and deregistered.

In 2010, the teacher worked on a pupil's assessed projects without the pupil being present and was dishonest about his contribution, the Teachers Disciplinary Tribunal said in a decision released today.

The teacher failed to provide pupil assessment material to the school's curriculum manager and head of department within the required time frame to allow moderation to be carried out.

In 2011, he provided photographic evidence of a pupil's work that conflicted with his own record and marking sheets, which led to the suggestion he had dishonestly awarded a pupil an undeserved mark.

The teacher refused to take part in a formal appraisal of his performance and removed a pupil evaluation sheet that contained a negative comment about him.

At a meeting with the school principal in June 2011, the suggestion emerged that pupils had been given credit for effectively copying information the teacher gave them and that he had carried out much of the assessed work for the pupils.

After a formal disciplinary process, he was found guilty of misconduct.

In the tribunal's decision, chairman Kenneth Johnston said it was difficult to over-emphasise the extent to which New Zealand's qualifications system, especially since the introduction of the National Certificate of Educational Achievement, depended on teachers dealing honestly and fairly in relation to pupil assessment.

There was no alternative but to censure the teacher and order his deregistration, he said.

Names of the parties and the area in which the man taught were not released by the tribunal.

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