All-boy classroom best for Jack

JO MOIR
Last updated 05:00 18/06/2014
Jack Richards
RIGHT CHOICE: Jack Richards with his father Tim.

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Children just want to go to high school where their friends are, but there's a lot more to think about for parents.

Jack Richards, 12, is heading to all-boys school Wellington College next year, and while that meant an education without girls, father Tim thinks it's the right choice.

"I'm pro single-sex schools because I think students, especially boys, do better in that environment," he said. "Part of that is because boys learn in a different way to girls, so that can be concentrated on in boys' schools."

Jack attends all-boys Wellesley College in Eastbourne, so he has not had any exposure to girls in the classroom.

Richards said he was "comfortable with the education Jack has received at Wellesley".

"It just means we need to make sure that Jack takes up opportunities with girls socially and through sport."

When Jack was given the choice of Wellington College, boys-only Scots College or co-ed Onslow College, he chose Wellington College because most of his friends were going there.

"Wellington College has a good reputation . . . and academically it's doihttp://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/10167425/Boys-doing-better-in-all-boys-schoolsng really well," his father said.

He was not surprised by the research confirming boys did better at single-sex schools. "Boys like structure and discipline, and boys' schools provide that well for them."

He attended a single-sex high school in Christchurch, while his brother went to a co-ed school because of the subjects on offer.

He said the debate about single-sex versus co-ed schools was one he had with friends sometimes and there were obvious pros and cons for both.

"Often co-ed schools have a broader range of subjects, for example in the arts, so that's a good reason for some kids to go to a particular school."

BOYS VS CO-ED - WHAT THE STATS SAY

 

Median percentage of boys achieving NCEA level 2 or equivalent:

Decile 1-4: 69.9 per cent at boys' schools, 61.1 per cent at co-ed

Decile 5-6: 76.7 per cent at boys' schools, 69.4 per cent at co-ed

Decile 7-8: 85.7 per cent at boys' schools, 78.7 per cent at co-ed

Decile 9-10: 93 per cent at boys' schools, 80.7 per cent at co-ed

Median percentage of boys leaving school with no qualifications:

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Decile 1-4: 18.5 per cent at boys' schools, 24.4 per cent at co-ed

Decile 5-6: 10.3 per cent at boys' schools, 17.5 per cent at co-ed

Decile 7-8: 5.8 per cent at boys' schools, 10.9 per cent at co-ed

Decile 9-10: 2.7 per cent at boys' schools, 9.4 per cent at co-ed

Percentage of Maori and Pasifika boys achieving NCEA level 2 or equivalent:

Decile 1-4: Maori, 60.1 per cent at boys' schools, 48.3 per cent at co-ed schools

Pasifika: 72 per cent at boys' schools, 55.8 per cent at co-ed

Decile 5-6: Maori, 63.4 per cent at boys' schools, 50.7 per cent at co-ed

Pasifika: 73.4 per cent at boys' schools, 61.3 per cent at co-ed

Decile 7-8: Maori, 76.2 per cent at boys' schools, 62.1 per cent at co-ed

Pasifika: 86.1 per cent at boys' schools, 66.5 per cent at co-ed

Decile 9-10: Maori, 77.7 per cent at boys' schools, 68.1 per cent at co-ed

Pasifika: 84.4 per cent at boys' schools, 62.4 per cent at co-ed

- The Dominion Post

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