Moving mountains for school

SHILO KINO
Last updated 05:00 24/07/2014
replica everest

CONQUERING EVEREST: Staff of Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate Middle School and Auckland Museum gather around the scaled 3D version of Everest.

moving replica
MOVING MOUNTAINS: Staff of Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate Middle School and Auckland Museum work together to move Mt Everest.

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The mountain Sir Edmund Hillary tamed has arrived at the South Auckland school that bears his name.

Auckland War Memorial Museum has given a 5 metre by 2m scale 3D version of Everest to Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate.

Sagamartha - the Nepalese name for Mount Everest - was the star attraction at the From the Summit: Hillary's Enduring Legacy exhibition at Franklin Art Gallery this month.

It took 15 members of the school and museum staff to carry the staggering 50kg mountain into the school library where it will now stay.

The move coincided with Sir Ed's birthday on July 20 when he would have turned 95.

Middle school principal Kallie Ngakuru-Syder calls the exhibition "incredible".

"Just looking at it now, you get a better perspective of what the mountain actually looks like," she says.

"For our children, they will really be able to appreciate Sir Ed's efforts and how he conquered Everest.

"We always try and get students to emulate Sir Ed's values and achievements so this will have a big impact on our school."

Ngakuru-Syder says Sir Ed always supported the school.

"Every year Sir Ed used to come and mix and mingle with the kids. He was the most humble guy who was always about giving.

"The Hillary family have been told of Everest coming here and they have been supportive," she says.

Auckland museum operations manager Max Riksen says it is hoped the gift will "inspire students".

"I have never seen anything like this before," Riksen says.

"You can literally trace down the route that Ed took and where they put up the base camps.

"It is a great learning tool and it will inspire."

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- Manukau Courier

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