Parents upset over religious classes in schools

MARYKE PENMAN
Last updated 05:00 20/04/2012

Relevant offers

Education

China trip opens up mind and career path Child got drunk on hand sanitiser - investigation Education right fit for man in the minority Waikato teacher reinstated despite report card comments Woolston embraces school merger Woolston embraces school merger Efforts to get more male teachers failing Finding out how children think when using iPads Burglars hit Manawatu schools Staff lay Massey bullying charges

Parents of public school students say their children are being punished for not attending religious classes.

Schools are legally obliged to be secular, but under the Education Act they are allowed to close for an hour a week for instruction, as long as children can opt out.

Peter Harrison, the founder of Facebook group Keep Religion Out of Schools, said children that opt out of religious studies often feel isolated and are left with nothing to do.

''They are effectively treated the same as in detention,'' Harrison says.

''They feel ostracised when they're removed from class and as though they're excluded from fun with all the other kids.''

An anonymous parent said his daughter had to sit in a corner by herself while her peers participated in bible class.

''Peer pressure and fitting in is a big thing for kids. My daughter came home and said: 'I'm sorry mummy, I promise to be good next time', because she couldn't tell the difference between being punished and opting out.''

He said the school also misled parents by holding bible classes under the guise of its Values In Action programme.

It was only when his daughter came home and asked to meet God that he realised it was religious instruction.

''She was also told dinosaurs weren't real. It was the exact opposite of what she'd been taught in science class.''

The Churches Education Commission chief executive Simon Greening said 140 Auckland schools participate in their religious education programme.

Mairangi Bay School, Belmont Primary and Torbay School students are taught by commission volunteers for 30 minutes each week.

Classes are usually held from 9am to 9.30am.

Both Browns Bay and Campbells Bay School were also involved, but chose to stop the programme this year.

Greening said lessons were based around the eight core values in the New Zealand curriculum and were linked to stories from the Bible.

''A lot of the parents are pro because we're teaching values and they're open to that. Most complaints come from parents who have already opted their children out,'' Greening said.

Harrison said existing religious instruction is too exclusive and does not reflect New Zealand's multi-cultural profile.
He supports secular values teaching.

''I'm not suggesting a big bang class but something covering common values like tolerance, love and integrity. There's no reason we can't teach that without referring to some archaic document.''

Greening said it was up to each school how they implement the programme.  

''We are living in a global society now and it's important to learn about Christianity and other religions that are in the mix. That's why we are moving away from the bibles in school titles.''

Ad Feedback

- Auckland Now

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content