Ministry advised against unregistered charter teachers

JOHN HARTEVELT
Last updated 05:00 05/09/2012

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Unregistered teachers will be allowed into charter school classrooms against official advice.

Official documents emerged yesterday showing the Education Ministry recommended all teachers at proposed charter schools should be registered, as in all other schools.

Associate Education Minister John Banks and Education Minister Hekia Parata announced last month that the new schools would be allowed to negotiate the proportion of registered teachers they wanted to employ.

The charter schools were rebranded "Partnership Schools" as part of the announcement.

But a regulatory impact statement, prepared by the ministry, advised that all teachers in charter schools should be registered.

"The overall potential for a negative impact on students' education from teachers who do not meet the minimum standards for the profession is high," the statement said. "Teacher registration is one of the most influential levers in raising teacher quality across the profession in both state and private schools."

Ian Leckie, president of teacher union the New Zealand Educational Institute, said the Government had "put ideology ahead of quality education for students".

Mr Banks said the ministry's advice was taken into consideration but Cabinet decided concerns were mitigated by the approval process put in place.

Charter schools wanting to employ unregistered teachers would have to prove they had the "knowledge, skills and competencies" to deliver the curriculum and that employing them would raise student achievement, he said.

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- Fairfax Media

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