Lynfield College students get behind Seaweek in Auckland

Lynfiled College students Dave Sharma, Irisha Inamke and Shahin Najak are ready to get stuck in and clean up the ...
ALASTAIR LYNN / FAIRFAX NZ

Lynfiled College students Dave Sharma, Irisha Inamke and Shahin Najak are ready to get stuck in and clean up the Waikowhai Coast.

Batman underwear, printers and couches are a few items you can find on a stroll at the beach.

But this is something Lynfield College students want to change.

The school is teaming up with Sustainable Coastlines to help clean up Auckland's coast on March 5.

Lynfiled College students Riana Hall, Phoebe Liu, Maya Micklefield, Eve Gabor hope the public will lend a hand on March 5.
ALASTAIR LYNN / FAIRFAX NZ

Lynfiled College students Riana Hall, Phoebe Liu, Maya Micklefield, Eve Gabor hope the public will lend a hand on March 5.

Over the past 15 years of cleaning up the Manukau Harbour, students have been finding all sorts of rubbish and they know this year will be no exception.

"People just chuck huge amounts of stuff on the beach," student Phoebe Liu says.

"They could easily go to a dump but it all just ends up in the ocean."

Student Shahin Najak says there has been a considerable increase in the amount of rubbish year on year.

"We wish we didn't have to do it," she says.

"It's a great thing that we can clean up the beach with the community but it's so preventable."

Auckland is surrounded by 3100 kilometres of coastline.

Ad Feedback

Sustainable Coastlines general manager Camden Howitt says illegal littering and dumping is having a severe impact on wildlife.

"About 72 per cent of what we find on the coast is single-use plastic," Howitt says.

"It's bottle caps, plastic bags, polyester and wrappers. This eventually breaks down into finer particles in the ocean.

"Sea life is mistaking plastic and rubbish for food, are ingesting it and dying as a result.

With the help of the public, Sustainable Coastlines has collected over 1,090,000 litres of rubbish from coastal areas throughout New Zealand.

There needs to be greater education around the effects dumping rubbish can have, Howitt says.

"We all have a part to play in conservation. It's critical for people to understand where the problems are and what they look like.

"You might think dropping one piece of rubbish isn't a problem but if 4 million are doing it then it will become a major problem."

There will be six stations will be set up around the Manukau Harbour as part of the clean-up day on March 5.

Visit sustainablecoastlines.org/event/manukau-harbour-clean/ for more information.

 - Stuff

Ad Feedback
special offers
Ad Feedback