BREAKING NEWS
Miner found dead in Waihi goldmine ... Read more
Close

Universities refuse to pay extra copyright licence fees

JODY O'CALLAGHAN
Last updated 05:00 08/03/2013

Relevant offers

Education

For kids' sakes, discredited 'stranger danger' concept must go, cops say Schools get fresh with more Fruit in Schools Pharmac announces changes to vaccination funding Fast times at Kingswell High Proposed closure of Salisbury School puts students at risk, lawyers say Parents with children at private schools investigated by IRD for unlawful tax rebates Online pornography warping adolescent brains 'We get to make a real difference for kids on the planet' Bruce Dale - loved by staff and students alike New Awatapu College op shop for students, by students

Universities are being taken to the Copyright Tribunal because they refuse to pay more than $20 a student in annual licence fees to photocopy authors' work.

Copyright Licensing New Zealand (CLNZ) has filed a disputes case against Universities NZ, which represents all eight universities, because it refuses to pay an extra $6 a student to retain its licence.

It is the first case of its kind to be dealt with by the tribunal, which is an independent disputes forum.

A copyright licence is required to produce materials such as the course packs that students buy containing photocopied chapters and articles, to save them buying textbooks.

A Universities NZ spokeswoman said CLNZ had chosen, without consultation, to refer its demands to the tribunal.

But CLNZ chief executive Paula Browning said the organisation was forced to take action after a year of failed negotiations to increase the $20 fee agreed in 2007.

"Despite increases in the average number of pages being copied per student and the ability the licence gives universities to provide copies electronically to students, the universities aren't prepared to agree to the modest $6 increase in the annual fee sought, which hasn't been adjusted in over five years."

Many universities had been increasing student fees by the maximum allowable a year, and expected them to buy multiple course materials, sometimes at a cost of up to $85 each, she said.

"At the same time, the universities are paying just $20 per student per year to compensate authors and publishers whose works are included in the course packs."

The universities' copyright licence expired on December 31, but has been extended by CLNZ until the case is settled.

Ad Feedback

- Fairfax Media

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content