Talks under way on Maori school

CHARLEY MANN
Last updated 05:00 27/04/2013
Hekia Parata
JOHN KIRK-ANDERSON/Fairfax NZ
EDUCATION MINISTER: Hekia Parata.

Relevant offers

Education

Call for a systems overhaul for a digital-age education sector Construction continues in North Canterbury's education building boom Whanau help and hinder Maori students' success at university, study says Teacher aides told there is no funding freeze for schools' funding Glenfield schoolgirl first to join prestigious military fitness club English Language Partners NZ helping migrants and refugees get into work Kiwi head of British bank honoured at Massey Alumni Awards Mum goes head-to-head with top Auckland school over length of son's hair Concerns over conflict of interest spell the end of religious instruction at Fenwick Primary School PPTA says Hawke's Bay has the country's 'most expensive' charter school

Consultation is about to begin over a controversial proposal to establish a new Maori school, driven by relatives of Education Minister Hekia Parata.

The move comes before the Government announces its final decisions on 17 school closures and mergers in Christchurch, expected by the end of May.

Before The Press revealed that Te Pa o Rakaihautu had been approved by former Education Minister Anne Tolley in November 2011, little was publicly known about the school, which could cost $17 million to establish.

Now the project is ready to enter consultation and is expected to be completed by the end of term two.

Associate Education Minister Pita Sharples has taken over the reigns of Te Pa as relatives of Parata are involved in the project.

Chairwoman Rangimarie Parata and Reihana Parata are both relatives of Parata.

Apryll Parata, Parata's sister, was Maori education deputy secretary when the school was endorsed.

She is now the ministry's deputy secretary for performance and change.

Correspondence between the ministry and Te Pa's proposers, released under the Official Information Act, reveals that Sharples approved consultation on December 12 last year.

An education report, signed by Sharples, stated: "The proposal to establish the new school, while being considered alongside the current reorganisation of schooling in the greater Christchurch region, was not considered as part of the plan for education renewal."

Ad Feedback

- The Press

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content