Destiny charter school bid rejected

MICHAEL DALY
Last updated 16:16 25/07/2013
Brian Tamaki
Fairfax NZ
DESTINY LEADER: Bishop Brian Tamaki.

Relevant offers

Education

Teen keen to unlock dyslexics' potential Four schools for $200m by 2018 Massey link to key diabetes research Bus crash: One remains in hospital Green light for $70m campus Championing a cultural treasure: Sounds good to me $67m Tauranga campus given green light Ministry steps in to heated zone stoush Vanuatu volunteer 'rewarded' Religious teaching review ruled out

Destiny Church's bid to establish a charter-type school has been declined.

The church was informed on Tuesday its application for a partnership school had been unsuccessful, spokesman Richard Lewis said.

So far Destiny had not received an explanation for the decision, but had been told there would be an opportunity to talk about the strengths and weaknesses of its application.

The application had been short-listed and church members had gone to Wellington to make a presentation to the government review team, he said.

"We saw partnership being an ideal fit in terms of what the Government is trying to do to close the gaps, particularly for Maori and Pacific students," Lewis said.

Destiny 's school in Wiri, south Auckland, now had 150 students from year 1-13, 80 per cent of them Maori.

Parents had to pay fees and the church also put resources into the school. Under the fully funded partnership model, Destiny School would have been able to grow, Lewis said.

Church leader Bishop Brian Tamaki tweeted today: "If any 4 of th successful Partnership Schools chosen by Hekia Parata are Weaker in Critique thn Destiny School then 'Discrimination' happnd."

A spokeswoman for Associate Education Minister John Banks said the selection process was still under way.

It was not appropriate to release details of any applicants yet. Selection was a procurement process and the contents of proposals were commercial in nature.

An announcement would be made when the selection process was complete, which was expected to be in late August.

She would not say how many proposals had been short-listed.

Some unsuccessful applicants had been informed, but no details would be provided for now.

A Ministry of Education spokeswoman said every partnership school proposal was being assessed against criteria such as their existing or potential education performance, as well as their ability to attract quality teachers and priority learners.

Other criteria included the content and rigour of their proposed curriculum, the likely level of community support, and the effectiveness of the school’s proposed management systems and governance structures.

Applicants' financial management skills and their readiness to open in 2014 were also considered in the assessment process.

In May the Partnership Schools/Kura Hourua Authorisation Board said it had received 35 applications from groups wanting to establish partnership schools.

Ad Feedback

Partnership schools would be accountable to the Government for raising achievement through a contract to deliver specific outcomes.

In return they would have more flexibility to make decisions about how they operated and used funding, such as the number of teachers they employed, how teachers were paid, the length of the school day and how the school bought resources.

They were a third type of state-funded school in addition to state schools and state-integrated schools.

- Stuff

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content