Pupils push positive body image messages in video

Palmerston North Girls' High pupils Alice Boyd, 16, Miriam Carr, 17, Holly Davis, 16, and Sophie Brokenshire, 16, are ...
GEORGIA FORRESTER/FAIRFAX NZ

Palmerston North Girls' High pupils Alice Boyd, 16, Miriam Carr, 17, Holly Davis, 16, and Sophie Brokenshire, 16, are encouraging women to love themselves in a body-image video they created for school.

A wave of "body love" is spreading across Palmerston North as pupils encourage women to be confident in their own skin.

A group of Palmerston North Girl's High School pupils have created a video promoting body love, as part of a social studies project.

Year 12 pupil Sophie Brokenshire, 16, said the project was about creating social action for the women of New Zealand.

Alice Boyd, 16, Miriam Carr, 17, Holly Davis, 16, and Sophie Brokenshire, 16, are jumping for joy about positive body ...
Georgia Forrester

Alice Boyd, 16, Miriam Carr, 17, Holly Davis, 16, and Sophie Brokenshire, 16, are jumping for joy about positive body image messages.

Her group of five chose body image as an issue, due to the impact pop culture and social media had on girls and women.

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She said girls compared themselves to pictures of women online and even to other pupils in the school ball photos.

Group member Holly Davis, 16, said models on Instagram and social media had a big effect on women, because they compared their own bodies to those on a screen.

Often images had been Photoshopped or framed in a certain way to create an image of the "perfect body".

"Some of my friends even have a perfect body, but are unhappy with it," Davis said.

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Although it could take some courage, she said it was important women simply loved themselves for who they were.

The group's video was shared on their Facebook page, Body Love, and has been viewed more than 1000 times.

Davis said she was surprised by how many people outside of school had seen the video.

"It shows how powerful a message can be if one video can teach all these people."

The pupils and teachers interviewed in the videos were randomly selected and interviewed over two lunch hours.

Group member Miriam Carr, 17, finished editing it after about 10 hours.

She said the amount of people it reached was awesome.

Brokenshire said that although the project was about women, it did not mean that men, boys, and those with non-conformed genders were not affected by body image issues.

"Our message is for people to be themselves, not somebody elses version."

 - Stuff

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