Schools free to act as digital hubs

Last updated 05:00 26/11/2013

Relevant offers

Education

Health professionals to tackle major issues at National Rural Health Conference Orewa teenager has high hopes to hear Students get out paint brushes and shovels to learn the meaning of community Sticks 'n Stones anti-bullying project founder Karla Sanders empowers young people Taranaki student on course for a career among the stars Onslow College physicists take competition for the third year running School doubles in size after curriculum change brings learning into 21st century Animal shelter reaps benefit of Bohally bake sale Universities should be places of intellectual diversity, not just cultural diversity Pregnancy no barrier to electrical engineering qualification

Schools will be allowed to compete with mainstream telecommunications companies by sharing their fibre-optic broadband connections with their local communities.

Associate Education Minister Nikki Kaye said the policy would mainly benefit rural and poor communities.

An industry source feared that the move could reduce demand for fully fledged residential ultrafast broadband connections, but Ms Kaye thought this unlikely.

Several schools have already teamed up with internet providers to offer wireless broadband to nearby residents, using their government-funded fibre connections as "backhaul".

Ms Kaye said the Ministry of Education would draft clear guidelines on the new policy.

All new arrangements would need to be individually sanctioned by the ministry.

Ad Feedback

- Fairfax Media

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content