Teens' tans come before exam results

JODY O'CALLAGHAN
Last updated 05:00 16/01/2014
NCEA teens in sun
Photo supplied
BEACHED: Rangi Ruru pupil Evie Burdon, 16, left, is unable to check her NCEA results due to having no wifi while holidaying in Kaiteriteri with friend Biddy Harris, also 16.

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While many teens were glued online to check exam results, Evie Burdon remained happily oblivious on a beach holiday without internet.

About half the country's 163,000 NCEA pupils had checked results that were released online yesterday, and there were 17,445 Cantabrians expecting Level 1, 2 and 3 results.

Evie, a 16-year-old Rangi Ruru Girls' School pupil, was unable to check her results while stuck with no remaining smartphone data and without wifi while on holiday in Kaiteriteri.

She was looking forward to finding out how she did on her first year of NCEA Level 1 but did not mind a few days grace spent on the beach, especially since she already had passed with merit before exams.

Another holidaymaker, Christchurch Girls' High School pupil Hannah Boyd, 17, was awake to check her NCEA Level 2 results from her mobile at her family's holiday spot in Whangamata at 5.20am yesterday.

After several page refreshes, she realised results hadn't been posted.

At 7.30am, she found she had passed chemistry, physics, maths, history and English.

"I put in all I could and got thrown some pretty foreign questions.

"I didn't disgrace myself, so it was good. I thought that I had bombed my whole physics exam and one of maths, but turned out getting merit."

It was "heartbreaking" to not do as well in other subjects, but she went shopping for clothes to "get over it".

Her sister Jessica, 18, was with her to check her Level 3 results and was happy with her overall merit.

"They were tougher exams than I had had in previous years. It was definitely an experience, but a good step up to university."

Her marks in physics, calculus, chemistry, geography and painting meant she had enough to study engineering at Canterbury University this year.

She said she had no problems getting her results from the website.

NZQA deputy chief executive Richard Thornton said there were no issues reported with the www.nzqa.govt.nz website, despite nearly 30,000 pupils logging in before 9am. About 80,000 had checked results by the end of yesterday.

Results would be mailed out from late January, and scholarship examination results would be available online in mid-February.

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- Canterbury

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