Teacher resigns over misconduct in class

Last updated 14:38 16/01/2014

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A primary school teacher has resigned after pinching, grabbing and inappropriately shouting at children in her class.

The teacher admitted the misconduct to the Teachers Council Disciplinary Tribunal and said she would never teach again.

The tribunal decision said the pinching was brought to light in 2012 when a parent heard from another parent of the teacher hurting children in the class.

She asked her six-year-old child if the teacher had been doing anything naughty.

The child said she had, and demonstrated by pinching the fleshy bit on the back of their arm, the mother said.

That mother also said she had received a call from another concerned parent, who had noticed marks on her child's back, which the child said were from the teacher's pinches.

The entire class was then interviewed and they spoke of "pinching, yelling and pulling", the tribunal decision said.

When confronted, the teacher admitted what had occurred and said she was under great stress at the time.

Her father had recently died and then her mother became ill so she took leave to take care of her.

During this time she became ill herself and was prescribed anti-depression medication, but when her leave ran out she had to return to work.

The tribunal did not revoke her teaching registration but placed a number of restrictions on her if she wished to teach again in the future.

These included showing the tribunal decision to any future employers and reporting to an approved mentor for the first 12 months of her re-employment.

The teacher said children were her passion but it was unlikely she would teach again.

Neither the teacher's name or the school at which she taught were named in the decision.

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- Fairfax Media

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