Young girl gives first aid at accident scene

SANDRA CROSBIE
Last updated 09:00 29/03/2014
 Feilding Intermediate pupil Sarah Jenson, 12, and her proud teacher Kat Wills
SANDRA CROSBIE
SCHOOLGIRL HERO: Feilding Intermediate pupil Sarah Jenson, 12, and her proud teacher Kat Wills recounting Thursday’s incident when Sarah used her first aid knowledge to assist an injured woman.

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Fast and mature reactions when helping an injured woman have earned a Feilding teenager hero status at her school.

Sarah Jenson, 12, was walking to Feilding Intermediate through an alleyway on Thursday when she heard another girl screaming.

The upset girl's mother had fallen off her bike and was lying on the ground, unable to move and in obvious pain.

"She had flipped and hit her hand and the handlebars were pushing in to her chest," Sarah said.

The girls moved the bike off the woman and Sarah ensured she was in the recovery position.

Sarah's class had spent a day doing first aid training with the Red Cross at the beginning of the year.

"She responded to questions, so I knew her airways were clear and I moved her leg and kept her still as she said her neck hurt.

"She was having trouble breathing."

Sarah then used her cellphone to call an ambulance.

"I was concerned I had no credit, then I remembered that emergency calls go through."

Though admittedly a bit shaky, Sarah gave all the details of the accident to an operator. She looked for an address from nearby letterboxes and when there weren't any she told them to look out for a flagpole on a property.

Sarah then asked a couple of students to stand on the road to flag the ambulance down.

A couple of friends arrived and helped Sarah keep the cyclist calm and take care of her daughter, who was in shock and upset.

Sarah's teacher Kat Wills said she was overwhelmed by the way she handled the situation.

"By the time teaching staff got there, everything was in control. It was amazing. She even told me to ring her mother as she was going in the ambulance to see things through. I know adults who wouldn't have acted as calmly and as effective as Sarah."

When Sarah returned to school later in the day from hospital she was heralded as a hero and made a fuss of.

"A hero is anyone who goes out of their way to help anyone", Wills said.

"It's absolutely wicked. They're the sort of people you want in the community."

Wills was also delighted to see practical value from her class completing the first aid course.

"The course didn't cost my students anything. But it is worth its weight in gold to give students those skills.

"It is absolutely invaluable."

Sarah said her family was also proud, and she was rewarded with a larger than normal icecream.

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- Manawatu Standard

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