Child protection programme goes international

HARRY PEARL
Last updated 05:00 01/05/2014

Relevant offers

Education

Children escape Palmerston North daycare, investigation launched Tauranga tumuaki unfairly dismissed from kura Pt Chevalier Kindergarten has a new home Christchurch school peers of Rakaia crash victim learn mindfulness Students given timeouts at Wainuiomata High School for incorrect shoes Taranaki principals hit back out at proposed Ministry of Education changes Campbell fails in a bid to be reinstated to principal's role at Salford School Students live, think in te reo at Te Rito: where English stops at the front gate Auckland teacher barred for having sex with student First jobs hard to find for primary teachers in the Waikato

A successful child protection programme developed in Hamilton will be centre stage at a prestigious international child abuse conference in Japan.

Anthea Simcock, chief executive of Child Matters, has been asked to give a paper about Buddy Day at a conference organised by the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect in September.

The conference in Nagoya draws hundreds of international experts in the field of child protection each year.

Simcock said the conference's theme - Towards Child-centred Societies - fitted the concept of Buddy Day well, and would be a good platform to talk about what had been learned from the programme. "It's really exciting to be able to represent New Zealand and it's a unique event that I don't think is done anywhere else in the world."

Since it was launched in November 2011, Buddy Day has gone from strength to strength and has outgrown its Hamilton roots.

Each year hundreds of cardboard cut-out "buddies" are dressed, decorated and given names and stories by children. The life-size cut-outs are then adopted by adults who look after the buddies for the day.

Simcock said she thought Buddy Day had been a success because it was a novel and non-threatening way to get communities to engage with a difficult subject.

It also encouraged children to talk about what it meant to be a good buddy, Simcock said.

"If we can get our children learning from an early age that actually you don't have to mind your own business when someone needs you, we could change some of the norms in society."

She said the project was not about disclosure of abuse, it was about reaching out to someone that was in trouble.

Registration for Buddy Day 2014, which is open to children and adults in Hamilton, Auckland, Tauranga and Wellington, opens in June.

Ad Feedback

- Waikato Times

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content