Munro's compassionate nature lives on

FLORENCE KERR
Last updated 10:50 05/08/2014
Jim Munro
SUPPLIED
IN MEMORY: Jim Munro, who died of cancer, is still giving to those in need.

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He was the kind of man that would help anyone in need, and posthumously through his family his compassionate nature lives on.

Jim Munro was giving by nature and his legacy lives on through the Jim Munro Compassionate Fund which assists Hospice Waikato patients who cannot afford medical costs and gives them an opportunity to get little treats while in the care of hospice.

Suffering from cancer, Jim Munro was assisted by Hospice Waikato which ensured his days were spent comfortably surrounded by family.

Munro was 74 when he died in September last year.

His daughter, Jude Nicholls, said it was her father's kind nature that inspired the fund.

"My sister and I were thinking what can we do to help hospice?

"The hospice team were very caring and gentle with Dad, and their support for our family was amazing. Hospice was looking at doing this and asked if we wanted it in our fathers name and we thought great, this is it."

Nicholls, her sister and mum all make a monthly donation toward the fund with Nicholls' daughter, Simonne, a year 12 student at St Peters School in Cambridge, doing regular fundraisers.

The fund will help patients who cannot afford medications or would like a little treat.

"Sometimes when you're not feeling well you just feel like eating something particular, and we were lucky enough to be able to zoom down the road and get him his favorite muffin.

"There are people in there [hospice] that don't have family to get that last little treat they might like and now with this fund [hospice] workers can zoom into town to get it." Nicholls said.

Hospice Waikato fundraising and events co-ordinator Monique Webb said the fund was used for patients during end of life care.

"This might be as small as some strawberries to indulge in, or practical help such as paying for medication, or an ambulance transfer for a struggling family," she said.

Webb said the first patient to be assisted by the fund received an urgently required medical lotion that was not subsidised.

"Some of our patients are on benefits and really struggle, they cannot afford to purchase these medications. The . . . fund allows us to act quickly and purchase these things for our patients."

The fund, which was officially launched in June, has had a boost by Simonne who raised $1234 through a mufti day at her school.

"Granddad Jim was a really kind and generous person and that's what inspired me to raise funds, he would of wanted me to do that." Simonne said.

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Munro came to New Zealand as a 11-year-old with his 9-year-old brother .

The pair were put into a foster home in Feilding, and when he came of age he joined the navy and moved to Auckland where he and his wife raised a family.

"I think it was Dad's upbringing that made him the caring man he was. He was the type that would give the shirt off his back," Nicholls said.

florence.kerr@fairfaxmedia.co.nz

- Waikato Times

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