Ill African traveller put in isolation at hospital

BEN HEATHER
Last updated 05:00 20/08/2014

Relevant offers

Health

The board that kicked the hornet's nest Children checked for typhoid after outbreak spreads south Pacific Music Awards nominee Annie Grace transformed by tragedy Budget 2017: Health funding to record levels with $1.7b injection to DHBs Dr Lance O'Sullivan tells anti-vaxxer to 'come to the hospital and see the ravaged bodies' after controversial film screening Former Taranaki basketballer Craig Hickford overcoming odds in battle back from bike accident Medicinal cannabis reduces seizures in children with Dravet syndrome, clinical study shows Watch: Hilary Barry hits out at anti-vaxxers, backs Dr Lance O'Sullivan Mental health packages part of plan for integrated healthcare in Waitemata Health professionals at Vaxxed should be fired: Lance O'Sullivan

A seriously ill African woman is in isolation at Wellington Hospital after immigration officials picked her up at Wellington Airport.

The woman, understood to be from the Democratic Republic of Congo, initially came to the attention of officials because of a problem with her travel documentation after arriving from Australia on Monday night. It was also noticed that she was "quite sick".

Health officials quickly ruled out Ebola, the deadly virus sweeping through West Africa, because the woman had not travelled to any infected countries, Ministry of Health director of public health Darren Hunt said.

However, she was put in isolation with suspected tuberculosis.

"It is very rare for passengers to need medical isolation on arrival," Hunt said.

The incident comes as the Government announces expanded powers for health officials to deal with Ebola in the unlikely event that it should reach New Zealand.

Share this story on Facebook

Ebola symptoms include fever, vomiting, aching muscles, intense weakness and, in some cases, bleeding from the eyes and mouth. The disease can be spread through bodily fluids, including sweat, blood and vomit, and victims can remain infectious even after death.

Western Africa is in the grip of the worst Ebola outbreak in history, with the latest World Health Organisation figures showing it has killed at least 1145 people, more than half the total number infected. It has spread to four countries in West Africa, including the continent's most populous nation, Nigeria.

In the latest response to the outbreak, Associate Health Minister Jo Goodhew said yesterday that, by the end of the month, health officials would be able to hold ships and planes containing people suspected of Ebola infections.

On August 10 the ministry announced it would be screening for Ebola at all international airports and seaports. Hunt said that since then six unwell people arriving here had been screened, but there had been no suspected cases.

Ad Feedback

- The Dominion Post

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should fluoride in water be the responsibility of central government?

Yes

No

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content