Rare operation to counter spasms

Last updated 05:00 22/11/2012
MEDICAL FIRST: Grace Yeats has had a deep brain stimulation, in what is believed to be a medical first for a child in New Zealand.
MEDICAL FIRST: Grace Yeats has had a deep brain stimulation, in what is believed to be a medical first for a child in New Zealand.

Relevant offers

Health

Editorial: Beancounters must loosen purse strings to save lives with defibrillators A Time and a Place: Father-daughter firefighting duo conquer Sky Tower climb Call to tackle toxic surgery smoke risk for doctors, nurses, patients Mobile phone cancer study finds link between phone use and tumours Manawatu health advocate applauds cigarette tax hike Are fitness trackers lying to us about how many calories we're burning? Junk Free June on the menu for Manwatu Mum-of-three Amanda Ferreira loses her battle with cancer DHBs still being shortchanged, says Labour - unveils health map to highlight regional shortfalls Putting her fears aside to help a child

Carterton girl Grace Yeats underwent a rare brain operation at Auckland's Starship children's hospital yesterday in a move aimed at reducing the severe spasms she suffers.

The 10-year-old had deep brain stimulation yesterday morning, in what is believed to be a medical first for a child in New Zealand.

She slept for much of the rest of the day, with her family "happy" with how she was doing.

Grace, a St Mary's School pupil, has been unable to move since May, when she was struck down with a mystery illness hours after complaining of a sore throat.

In a two-part operation yesterday, doctors drilled into her skull and inserted electrodes in her brain.

The electrodes were then wired to a pacemaker, which was implanted in her chest.

Jonathan Tanner, spokesman for the Grace Yeats Trust, said the surgery took "multiple hours" but the family were glad it had gone ahead as planned.

"They're happy . . . the doctors were only going to do [both parts of the operation] if they were happy with how she was, so that says something."

The device will now be calibrated to stimulate and counter the section of her brain that causes the intense and painful spasms that affect Grace's body.

Ad Feedback

- The Dominion Post

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should fluoride in water be the responsibility of central government?

Yes

No

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content