Surgeon in probe seeks certification

Last updated 05:00 01/03/2013
Mike Parry
DEREK FLYNN/Marlborough Express
Surgeon Michael Parry
Jim Nicholls
BOTCHED OP: Jim Nicholls, 80, suffered massive blood loss during an operation by Michael Parry.

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The surgeon at the centre of a criminal investigation into botched surgery has applied for a new practising certificate.

Zimbabwe-born doctor Michael Parry stood down from his post at Wairau Hospital after the death of Jim Nicholls, 81, following surgery last May to remove a hernia and his gall bladder. It is understood Mr Parry has been on paid leave since.

Another patient, Rachel Riddell, 31, died of significant blood loss in January 2011 after having her gall bladder removed by Mr Parry.

A coroner's inquiry into the two deaths was put on hold in December when police launched their own investigation into one of the deaths, to determine whether there was any "liability or culpability".

Both deaths and botched operations on two women sent to Christchurch for repair have also come under the police microscope.

Mr Parry's practising certificate has expired, but the Medical Council confirmed yesterday that the general surgeon had applied for a new one.

According to the council's website, a person must be registered and hold a current certificate to practise medicine in New Zealand.

"With a practising certificate you are authorised, and considered competent and fit to practise medicine within the scope of practice and conditions given on your certificate," the website says.

Mr Parry moved to New Zealand in April 2010 after working in hospitals in South Africa, England and Abu Dhabi.

Inquiries with medical authorities overseas show no previous investigations into his work.

He is still registered to practise in Britain.

It is understood police will question Mr Parry next week.

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- The Dominion Post

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