BREAKING NEWS
Man shot by police in Rotorua 2 weeks ago has died in hospital ... more soon
Close

Measles confirmed in Auckland

Last updated 16:13 31/12/2013

Relevant offers

Health

Canterbury Charity Hospital founder Phil Bagshaw slams Government data on unmet need Maia Health hits $2.2m of $5.2m fundraising target Staff injuries following fancy refurbishment of Hutt City Council offices Wellington's 'tin knee club' defying doctor's orders and running half marathons SmileDial founder Kelly Dugan wants to be fresh face on CDHB Gene thought to partly explain high rates of obesity among Samoans The regions where you're most likely to miss out on surgery Chiefs flanker Liam Messam bandaged up in first aid session Fluoride could become DHB election issue Near misses prompt patient identification policy at Nelson Marlborough DHB

The first case of measles in Auckland since June 2012 has been confirmed.

The Auckland Regional Public Health Service said a person contracted measles this month while in Sydney taking part in in the 2013 World Supremacy Battlegrounds hip-hop competition.

Teams from other places in New Zealand, including Hamilton and Huntly, also took part in the event, it said.

The service said it was following standard procedures and advised people to be vigilant for symptoms.

It was following up with those who had had contact with the infected person, alerting Auckland health professionals and emergency departments, and updating the Ministry of Health, it said.

Medical Officer of Health Dr Catherine Jackson warned that measles was extremely infectious and could cause serious complications.

Measles symptoms start with a high fever, which develops about 10 days after exposure. This is followed by one or more of the following: a runny nose, cough, red eyes and small white spots inside the mouth. A red blotchy rash on the neck and face appears three or four days later before spreading to the rest of the body.

"Auckland's last major measles outbreak in 2011 demonstrates how quickly the disease can spread: one infected child resulted in nearly 500 cases and 80 hospital admissions," Jackson said.

"If you have measles symptoms or any concerns, phone your GP or Healthline on 0800 611 116. If you need to see a doctor it is important to call first to avoid spreading measles in the waiting room."

Ad Feedback

- Fairfax Media

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should fluoride in water be the responsibility of central government?

Yes

No

Vote Result

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content