Measles confirmed in Auckland

Last updated 16:13 31/12/2013

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The first case of measles in Auckland since June 2012 has been confirmed.

The Auckland Regional Public Health Service said a person contracted measles this month while in Sydney taking part in in the 2013 World Supremacy Battlegrounds hip-hop competition.

Teams from other places in New Zealand, including Hamilton and Huntly, also took part in the event, it said.

The service said it was following standard procedures and advised people to be vigilant for symptoms.

It was following up with those who had had contact with the infected person, alerting Auckland health professionals and emergency departments, and updating the Ministry of Health, it said.

Medical Officer of Health Dr Catherine Jackson warned that measles was extremely infectious and could cause serious complications.

Measles symptoms start with a high fever, which develops about 10 days after exposure. This is followed by one or more of the following: a runny nose, cough, red eyes and small white spots inside the mouth. A red blotchy rash on the neck and face appears three or four days later before spreading to the rest of the body.

"Auckland's last major measles outbreak in 2011 demonstrates how quickly the disease can spread: one infected child resulted in nearly 500 cases and 80 hospital admissions," Jackson said.

"If you have measles symptoms or any concerns, phone your GP or Healthline on 0800 611 116. If you need to see a doctor it is important to call first to avoid spreading measles in the waiting room."

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- Fairfax Media

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