Seddon struck by another 'severe' 5.5-magnitude earthquake

The Cosy Corner Cafe, in Seddon, escaped damage in Thursday's 5.5-magnitude quake.
SCOTT HAMMOND/FAIRFAX NZ

The Cosy Corner Cafe, in Seddon, escaped damage in Thursday's 5.5-magnitude quake.

Seddon has been rocked by another powerful earthquake, and some residents have had enough.

The 5.5-magnitude quake struck 35 kilometres east of the township at 3.30pm on Thursday.

Geonet ranked the quake intensity as 'severe' and it was followed by three other quakes in 30 minutes.

Seddon Volunteer Firefighter senior station officer Rebecca Stevens, left, pictured with Darryn McKenzie, after the ...
DEREK FLYNN/FAIRFAX NZ

Seddon Volunteer Firefighter senior station officer Rebecca Stevens, left, pictured with Darryn McKenzie, after the November 14 earthquake.

Cosy Corner Cafe worker Kayla Jones said the township was experiencing quakes every day but Thursday's was a big one.

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"It was bloody scary. It's those big ones that make you stand up and swear which I dread," she said.

The cafe escaped the quake unscathed but Jones said the larger quakes had more of a mental toll.

"People are being strong for each other and their families but inside we're all crapping our pants," she said.

"It reminds you of everything. We're waiting for that big one."

Awatere Accommodation owner Darren McKenzie said he preferred when large quakes occurred during the day.

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"It's not going to turn the lights out so it's only half as scary," he said.

The quake rivalled Christmas morning's 4.7-magnitude shake but his business had not sustained damage, he said.

McKenzie was on the road to recovery after he suffered a heart attack following the November 14 earthquake.

He had been saved by his firefighting neighbour after the emergency phone lines went down and they checked on his business.

McKenzie said he was feeling better day-by-day and would undergo routine health checks in the new year.

Seddon Volunteer Fire Brigade chief fire officer Keiron Hebberd said it was the first large earthquake he had felt in a while but there had been no call-outs for help.

"You actually felt it, it wasn't just a quick jolt," he said.

"I think everyone felt it here, I haven't seen any damage yet but it's always hard to tell."

The greater Seddon area was still getting over two large earthquakes in 2013 when the November quake struck.

Awatere Christian Joint Venture reverend Dawn Daunauda said for some residents the frequent aftershocks were too much.

"We just got under the table this time, we're getting quite used to them," she said.

Daunauda said she knew two people who moved away from the Seddon area after the 7.8-magnitude earthquake.

"They've gone, they've had enough," she said.

Once the shaking stopped, Daunauda left her Seddon home to visit a neighbour for a cup of tea.

"It's a good way to get together, there was even Christmas cake," she said.

 - The Marlborough Express

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