John Key defends daughter's 'art'

Last updated 15:17 11/05/2014
John Key
CHE BAKER/FAIRFAX

DEFENDS DAUGHTER: Prime Minister John Key speaks at the National Party conference in Queenstown on Sunday.

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Prime Minister John Key has defended a raunchy photo of his daughter Stephanie wearing a pink traditional Native American headpiece saying the picture was not culturally insensitive.

Key responded to questions by the media at the National Party conference in Queenstown today about the latest pictures of his daughter Stephanie, 21, emerging online.

An album of photos, featuring on Stephanie's Facebook page, shows a photo of her wearing the war headdress, pink lacy underwear and a star covering her nipple.

Key denied any claims it was culturally offensive.

''I'm personally very proud of her,'' Key said.

Other photos included her wearing a red PVC nurse's uniform and lying topless in a bathtub with flower petals and a pair of lips covering a nipple.

Stephanie was a student at the Paris College of Art.

She would have to find her way in the world like the hundreds of thousand other university students from New Zealand, Key said. 

''She will have her own view on what art is,'' he said.

''All I hope, like any parent, is that she is happy and healthy and following her dream,'' he said.

Last year, Stephanie made headlines after stripping down for a series of provocative self-portraits.

One of the shots showed her naked apart from some strategically placed Big Macs and a large helping of McDonald's fries.

Another similar shot has sushi covering her breasts and an octopus covering her groin. 

Her work was chosen to promote the Paris Design Week, a prestigious art show. 

It was the second time in a week photographs of females wearing the war headdress caused a stir in New Zealand with promoters of the annual Rhythm and Vines music festival forced to pulled advertising that included two young girls partying in headdress after they received several complaints.

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- The Southland Times

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