Kim Dotcom gives $250k to own party

MICHAEL FOX
Last updated 17:03 26/05/2014

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Kim Dotcom has donated $250,000 to the political party he founded.

The Electoral Commission's register of political donations shows Dotcom donated the money to the Internet Party on May 14.

The Internet Party is polling at about 1 per cent, far below the 5 per cent needed to guarantee a seat in Parliament.

However, a deal with the Mana Party is a near certainty. The deal would allow the party to enter Parliament on the coat-tails of Mana leader Hone Harawira should he hold his Te Tai Tokerau electorate.

Dotcom is no stranger to political donations.

ACT MP John Banks is on trial for "transmitting a return of electoral expenses knowing that it is false in a material particular" after a $50,000 donation from Dotcom to his campaign for the Auckland mayoralty in 2010.

The donation was recorded as anonymous though the Crown says Banks knew who it was from.

The Electoral Commission rules state that donors who give more than $15,000 to a party must be publicly disclosed in the party's annual return of donations.

Parties must also make an immediate disclosure if a donor gives more than $30,000 in a 12-month period.

Internet entrepreneur Dotcom, who was granted permanent residence in New Zealand in 2010, officially launched the Internet Party on March 27.

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