New law to protect sex and violence victims

STACEY KIRK
Last updated 08:56 25/06/2014

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Victims of serious violent and sexual offences can now have a "non-contact order" placed on their attackers.

The new legislation is the latest in a raft of reforms to the way in which the justice system treats victims of violent crime.

The non-contact order may be applied to offenders who have been sentenced to more than two years in prison for a violent or sexual offence.

It prohibits the offender from contacting the victim in any way, including electronically. In some cases, offenders can be banned from entering, living, or working in a particular area.

Victims must apply to a court for the non-contact order after the offender has been sentenced. The order can also cover an offender's associates.

Justice Minister Judith Collins said the new measures would help victims move on with greater piece of mind.

"This Government has made perfectly clear its commitment to putting victims at the heart of our criminal justice system," she said.

"Introducing these non-contact orders is one more way to ensure victims feel safe and protected from further offending.

"We're ensuring victims' are protected and their voices in our criminal justice system remain strong."

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