Today in politics: Thursday, 3 July

Last updated 05:00 03/07/2014

Relevant offers

Politics

Stacey Kirk: Reinvesting in education at the expense of the younger generation Give me some election cash, and I'll promise to forget who you are David v Jacinda: Time for tough talk on public policy Oscar Kightley: 'Uncomfortable secrets from our past' New Zealand strengthens ties with Sri Lanka Jonathan Milne: Voters must know who's secretly bankrolling mayoral candidates Prime Minister John Key and the elephant in the Sri Lankan courtroom Governor General Dame Patsy Reddy visits Nelson's Whakatu Marae Student loan borrowers seeking bankruptcy as millions in debts wiped due to insolvency Live by the sword, die by the sword - Colin Craig's life lesson

Horan channels old boss Peters

Independent MP Brendan Horan has launched a Save Our Seniors campaign, calling for fair incomes for pensioners funded by a 0.1 per cent financial transaction tax.

In what could have been an extract from his old boss Winston Peters' speech notes, he said what National was doing to seniors was inhumane. "Words cannot convey the deep sense of tragedy when 85-year olds are driven to commit suicide," Horan said. 

Candidate labours for McCully motive

Labour's Epsom candidate, Michael Wood, may be taking Foreign Minister Murray McCully's  ''McCulliavelli'' reputation a bit  far. The East Coast Bays MP may be at the cutting edge of any deal to allow Conservatives leader Colin Craig into the House via his seat.

As  the Malaysian diplomat crisis  rumbled on, Wood asked: ''Is he so Machiavellian that he would engineer his own demise in order to facilitate a deal with the Conservatives?'' Err no.

Night protest misses target

A wee shout-out to the elderly man who so wanted to get his message across that he picketed Parliament even when MPs were tucked up in their taxpayer-funded beds.

The man stood outside the House all night with a placard protesting about a China-related issue.When  our reporter went  to interview him yesterday he was gone. We understand he speaks little English but if he comes back we will try to find out what he feels so strongly about.

Keith gets No 2 spymaster post

Lawyer Ben Keith has been appointed deputy inspector-general of intelligence and security for a three-year term. Prime Minister John Key said it was the first appointment to the position, which was created by changes to the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Act 1996, in September.

Keith was with  Crown Law, where he has been counsel for constitutional, human rights and international law.

Ad Feedback

- The Dominion Post

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should the speed limit be raised to 110kmh on some roads?

Yes

No

Vote Result

Related story: 110kmh limit moves closer

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content