Maori King's son let-off 'cultural hypnosis'

Last updated 10:14 04/07/2014
Korotangi Paki

ROYALTY: King Tuheitia and his son Korotangi Paki.

Opinion poll

Should the Maori King's son have been discharged without conviction on a drink driving charge?



Vote Result

Relevant offers


No increased medicine costs under TPPA TPPA: Tariff elimination big winner for everything but dairy Letter to Australia: What the bloody hell are ya? Annette King hits back at Bill English claims over detained Kiwis Economist who branded NZ economy rockstar says 'don't panic' New social housing launched in Ngaruawahia Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown named one of world's best female mayors National science and research investment strategy released by Government Crown concedes it failed to protect Lake Horowhenua from pollution Ministry of Health forces managers to sign statements on DHB proposals

A judge who discharged the Maori King's son without conviction is suffering from "cultural hypnosis", former Maori Affairs Minister Dover Samuels says.

Korotangi Paki, 19, pleaded guilty in the Auckland District Court yesterday to drink driving, two counts of burglary and one of theft.

Judge Philippa Cunningham discharged Paki without conviction on all charges but imposed a special condition that he provide the court evidence he did not have an alcohol problem or if he did, that he had addressed it with counselling.

Paki's lawyer, Paul Wicks QC, told the court a conviction would impede his ability to accede to the throne.

Samuels told Radio New Zealand this morning the judge's decision should not have taken into account Paki's royal status.

"I think the judge is absolutely suffering from some sort of cultural hypnosis," he said.

"I think she's been persuaded and I think she's wrong, and to me I don't think most New Zealander's would support that."

Paki should not have hid behind his royalty and taken responsibility for his actions, Samuels said.

"Most New Zealanders would think that this is a young man who has committed an offence and pleaded guilty to it and would have the courage to stand up and say 'treat me no different to anybody else'," Samuels said.

"It doesn't matter what Tuku Morgan thinks."

Morgan, a former MP and the Maori King's representative, said outside court yesterday the case was a "major turning point in [Paki's] life".

"He's an expectant father and you can see he's brought shame upon his father, his family and Tainui," Morgan said.

He heralded the court's decision as a victory for Maori.

"I think that is a recognition of the uniqueness of this country. Maori tikanga, Maori culture has been recognised today by a very senior court," he said.

Samuels said the uniqueness would have been recognised if Paki had stepped up to his responsibilities and not used his royalty as a cop-out.

* Comments are now closed on this story.

Ad Feedback

- Stuff


Special offers
Opinion poll

Should the speed limit be raised to 110kmh on some roads?



Vote Result

Related story: 110kmh limit moves closer

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content