Labour considers sexual violence court

23:38, Jul 03 2014

A Labour government would plough $15 million a year into tackling domestic violence and consider establishing a special court to deal with sexual violence cases.

The party has released a suite of policies around family and sexual violence.

It follows proposals announced by National this week that include a trial of GPS alarms for those at risk, and a special adviser within the Ministry of Justice.

Labour leader David Cunliffe said his party would put $60 million over four years into frontline services, primary prevention and education. This would include more money for temporary housing.

It will also consider a report from the Law Commission, yet to be completed, on reforms of the justice system.

One option might be a specialist court. A review of the justice system would look at alternative cross-examination rules and extra training and support.

There would also be a review of prosecution guidelines and the operation of protection orders.

Domestic violence has a "devastating physical and emotional impact on the lives of a great many of our women and children", Cunliffe said.

Labour's "action plan" would be led from within Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, he said.

Advertisement

Stuff