Rich-poor gap not growing: report

Last updated 14:47 08/07/2014

Relevant offers


Education Minister Hekia Parata announces Marlborough colleges decision Live Chat replay: Chief Social Worker Paul Nixon talks child abuse in NZ Partner of Kiwi detainee speaks out about detention centre struggles Stories of detained Kiwis show 'crude' nature of Aus policy - Andrew Little Children's flag referendum views are being heard by voters in their families 'Our job is not to censor. We're not serving the political elite, business or corporations' 'I don't want to be prime minister' – Jacinda Ardern Former Australian detainee burglary arrest not a surprise - Andrew Little NZ flag shown in Islamic State video on group's enemies Why I'm voting my daughter's choice in the flag referendum

A new report claims child poverty rates have dropped significantly over the past two years, although that was largely the reversal of an earlier increase.

Dr Brian Perry's annual household income report was released today by the Social Development Ministry, and does not paint a simple picture of inequality in New Zealand.

The 245-page report has been widely used by the Government to dismiss opposition claims that there is a growing gulf between the rich and poor in New Zealand.

The report found that child poverty rates, using a formula which compares income to accommodation costs, dropped 3 per cent in the 2011 to 2013 period. However, this was roughly the amount child poverty increased in the 2009-2011 period.

"Today's release shows we are making progress," Social Development Minister Paula Bennett said in a statement.

Although the report found that there was no "discernable" increase in income inequality in New Zealand since the 1990s, it concluded that the income in many households is only now recovering from declines during the global financial crisis.

Perry's report found that household income across New Zealand rose 4 per cent (above inflation) between 2011 and 2013, with the gains "fairly evenly" spread across income groups.

However, the report says lower income families were hit harder by the global financial crisis in 2009 to 2011.

"As a result... [from 2009 to 2013] the net change in average incomes for each of the lower five deciles was close to zero, whereas there was around a 5 per cent gain for the top five deciles."

Broadly the report maintains that over a longer period it has not found evidence of a growing gap between the rich and the poor.

Using the Gini co-efficient, which measures the statistical distribution of income across an economy, the report found that the top decile in New Zealand received 8.0 times that of the bottom decile, the average for the OECD, but more equal than Australia or Canada.

According to the report, the top 1 per cent of New Zealand received 8 per cent of all taxable income in 2010 and 2011, down from 9 per cent in the 1990s.

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should the speed limit be raised to 110kmh on some roads?



Vote Result

Related story: 110kmh limit moves closer

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content