IPCA report on Kim Dotcom spying due

ANDREA VANCE
Last updated 14:31 16/07/2014
KIM DOTCOM
KIM DOTCOM: Under surveillance.

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The police watchdog will tomorrow release its findings on a police investigation into illegal spying on Kim Dotcom.

Green party co-leader Russel Norman asked the Independent Police Conduct Authority to investigate how detectives handled his complaint about surveillance of tech mogul Dotcom and his piracy co-accused Bram van der Kolk.

The inquiry began last year when police said they would not press criminal charges.

The police's Organised and Financial Crime Agency of New Zealand (OFCANZ) asked for Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) help late in 2011 when it was planning a raid on Dotcom's home. Surveillance conducted by the foreign spy agency was illegal because Dotcom is a permanent resident of New Zealand.

The police investigation into illegal spying was code-named "Operation Grey". Police have refused to release the file, however an executive summary made public last August showed three GCSB agents declined to be interviewed.

One attended a crucial meeting between GCSB and OFCANZ and processed a "request for information". Another agent changed their story during the course of the investigation. The documents also referred to conflict between OFCANZ Detective Inspector Grant Wormald and GCSB staff about the meeting, on December 14, 2010.

Police found one communication relating to Dotcom was illegally intercepted by GCSB agents. However, police said it was not done with "intent" and so would not press charges.

At the time Norman accused police of "double standards."

The IPCA report will be made public at 10am. A police spokesman said they would comment on the findings then.

The row over Dotcom's extradition blew up again this week after new Immigration New Zealand papers revealed the Security Intelligence Service (SIS) first objected to Dotcom's application for permanent residency.

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