Conservative Party logo rejected

STACEY KIRK
Last updated 17:27 28/07/2014
conservative vote logo rejected

REJECTED: The Conservative Party's logo has been rejected.

Relevant offers

Politics

PM: Winston Peters looking for attention with race-based attacks on reporters Budget will bump up NZ's infrastructure spending, finance minister signals Horowhenua mayor attempts once again to reinstate his ousted deputy When the river runs dry: The true cost of NZ water The immigration debate: Please leave your logic at the border A brief glossary of terms politicians use in the immigration debate Maori land reform bill continues to divide Mana and the Maori Party despite a promise to work together NZ's net migration gain still at record highs near 72,000 as arrivals continue to climb Reserve Bank promotes Geoff Bascand, possible future governor, to deputy chief executive Ilam candidate Raf Manji questions how incumbent Gerry Brownlee can juggle roles

The Electoral Commission has rejected the Conservative Party logo on the grounds it could "cause confusion or mislead electors".

The logo the party tried to register was simply the word "vote" inside a bright blue speech bubble.

In a decision released today, the commission said the logo could be confused with other instructions on the voting paper.

"The voting paper prescribed in the legislation contains instructions for voters," the commission said in a statement.

"The word 'vote' is used several times in these instructions.

"The Commission concluded that the appearance of the proposed party logo on the ballot paper featuring the word 'vote' could be regarded as instructive and therefore be likely to confuse and mislead voters."

However, the Conservative Party already has another registered logo, which could appear on the ballot paper.

Although the Commission declined to register the party's new logo, it did not prevent the party from using that design in its campaign material.

"There are no restrictions in the Electoral Act regarding what logo a party may use to represent themselves in their campaign," the commission said.

"Parties are free to use other logos or symbols in addition to a registered logo as part of their branding."

Colin Craig, the Conservative Party leader, said he was “slightly disappointed” at the Electoral Commission’s decision.

Craig said he felt the logo was “reasonable” but would go back to the drawing board to rework a similar logo.


Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Comments

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should the speed limit be raised to 110kmh on some roads?

Yes

No

Vote Result

Related story: 110kmh limit moves closer

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content