Cameron Slater takes legal action

Last updated 19:06 04/09/2014
Cameron Slater
BLOGGER: Cameron Slater

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Blogger Cameron Slater has launched injunction proceedings in a bid to gag three of New Zealand's largest media companies.

Slater served papers on Fairfax, APN and MediaWorks today to try to prevent them from running further stories using emails that were allegedly hacked from his accounts.

A fourth defendant is listed as ‘‘unknown person’’, referring to the person alleged to be in possession of the hacked emails and behind the “Whaledump” Twitter accounts.

Slater's emails feature in Nicky Hager's book Dirty Politics and were part of the sequence that resulted in Justice Minister Judith Collins' resignation from Cabinet on Saturday.

The three media companies have been served the notice and will appear in court for an initial hearing in Auckland tomorrow. 

The move, if successful, would block any further stories using the leaked emails.

Court documents served on behalf of Slater claim the emails, hacked from his personal email accounts and Facebook account, represent a breach of confidence and breach of privacy.

The claim seeks an injunction preventing any publication or dissemination of the emails or Facebook messages, as well as any copies of stored material.

It also asks for all electronic copies to be returned to Slater's possession, and for costs to be awarded to him.

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