I'd rather bike or bus - mayor's car may stay in garage

Last updated 05:00 16/10/2010
Celia Wade-Brown
MAARTEN HOLL/The Dominion Post
CYCLING MAYOR: Celia Wade-Brown.

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Cyclist and Snapper card-holder Celia Wade-Brown is in no hurry to exchange two wheels for a $70,000 Audi.

The capital's new mayor – who jumped on her bike to ride to the Wellington City Council building when the election results were announced this week – will have the option of a more comfortable ride for the next three years.

However, when asked yesterday whether she would be using the mayoral car in future, she said it was not something she had considered yet.

The mayoral car is an Audi A3, bought by the council in February 2008. Spokesman Richard MacLean said the council replaced the mayor's car every three years, but as yet there had been no discussion with Ms Wade-Brown about her preferences.

The car's personalised number plate, APW, stands for Absolutely Positively Wellington, and would remain with the council.

As a councillor, Ms Wade-Brown rarely claimed travel expenses because of her commitment to commuting by bicycle. She said she hoped to still cycle to work when practical. "I've always stood for good transport choices. It will depend on the occasion."

When The Dominion Post called Ms Wade-Brown yesterday evening, she was about to get the bus to her Island Bay home from a training course for new mayors held in the city centre.

She said that, whenever possible in her new role, she would like to walk, but the length of the days she expected to work would not always make walking or cycling possible. "I'm not ready to commit to one mode of transport."

Ms Wade-Brown said she was considering leaving her folding bicycle at the council building, giving her the option to cycle one way at least – at the same time as keeping up with her exercise regime.

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- The Dominion Post

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