Expelled MP likely to take up job at UN

BELINDA MCCAMMON
Last updated 05:00 05/06/2011
Chris Carter
KENT BLECHYNDEN/The Dominion Post
UN BOUND: Expelled MP Chris Carter is set to take up a job with former NZ Prime Minister Helen Clark at the UN.

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Axed Labour MP Chris Carter looks set to take up a job with his old boss, Helen Clark, at the United Nations before the end of the year.

The independent MP has just returned from a three-week trip to New York where he said he had positive meetings over working at the UN. "I had some very interesting and productive interviews, so we'll see."

If Carter does take up a job at the UN, he will join former PM Clark, who is the administrator of the UN's Development Programme.

Carter said nothing was confirmed. "Until it's in the hand, it's not in the bag."

If the role is confirmed, Carter said it was likely he would leave to take up the job before the November 26 election.

However his departure would not cause a by-election as it is within the six-month threshold.

Carter said he "had no intention" of causing a by-election anyway.

"As tempted as I was to stick it to Mr Goff, I care more about Labour than that."

Carter said the role would not be working in Clark's team but it would be at the UN.

Carter was expelled from the Labour Party in October last year. The Labour Party council ruled that Carter had brought the party into disrepute by acting in a misleading manner that was likely to foment internal discontent and encourage external ridicule.

He was expelled from the Labour caucus in June after he sent an anonymous letter to members of the media saying a coup was being planned against party leader Phil Goff. But when he was named as the source of the letter he took two months' stress leave.

He was the first MP expelled by the party since John A Lee in March 1940.

At the time of his expulsion Carter, who represented the Auckland seat of Te Atatu, said he would remain in parliament until the next election as an independent MP.

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