Statement from Darren Hughes

Last updated 15:16 08/06/2011

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I have been advised that having completed a long and thorough investigation, the police will be taking no further action in their inquiry involving me.

To be falsely accused of something I did not do, let alone a serious crime, has been one of the most challenging experiences in my life.

However, I held strong to the belief that I had done nothing wrong and that being truthful would see my name cleared.   I have always had full confidence that our independent legal processes would lead to the right outcome and the police's decision shows that such confidence was well-placed.

Although resigning both from my portfolios and Parliament, the career to which my life was devoted, was a very high price to pay, the frenzied media attention left me with no choice.  Given the important issues facing the country in the coming election, I was not prepared to allow this matter, and the intense media interest and speculation it provoked, to distract attention from the Labour Party and the promotion of our policies in this important election year.

I'm enormously grateful to the huge number of people - family and friends, colleagues from all political persuasions and good and decent Kiwis - who have sent messages of personal support and good wishes; that has meant a great deal to me.  Of particular importance have been the messages from people who live in Horowhenua and Kapiti.

At age 24 I was elected to serve my community as a Labour Member of Parliament.  I loved every day of it, and tried to bring enthusiasm and commitment to every task I was given.  Nothing will ever be able to take away the pride and satisfaction I feel at having been able to make a contribution to public service.

I feel that I still have much to offer and I am looking forward to the future with optimism.  Whatever I do, I would like to continue to serve our community and our country.  But there's plenty of time.

I now intend to take some time to consider plans for the next phase of my life and will not be making any further public comment.

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