First Maori Speaker of the House dies

Last updated 19:01 06/04/2012
Sir Peter Tapsell entered Parliament in 1981 as the Labour MP for what was then the Eastern Maori electorate, and held the role of Speaker from 1993 to 1996.

SIR PETER TAPSELL: Entered Parliament in 1981 as the Labour MP for what was then the Eastern Maori electorate, and held the role of Speaker from 1993 to 1996.

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Sir Peter Tapsell, the first Maori Speaker of the House, has died at home in Ruatoria, aged 82.

Sir Peter, who entered Parliament in 1981 as the Labour MP for what was then the Eastern Maori electorate, held the role of Speaker from 1993 to 1996.

Before becoming Speaker, Sir Peter held the portfolios of  internal affairs, arts, police, civil defence, science and forestry.

He retired from politics in 1996.

Sir Peter, who was an orthopaedic surgeon before becoming an MP, was awarded a MBE in 1968 for services to medicine and the Maori people.

Sir Peter has four children - two sons and two daughters.

His tangi will be held at Maketu Marae.

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