First boy racer car crushing

ANDREA VANCE AND KATE CHAPMAN
Last updated 17:49 20/06/2012

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The boy racer who faces having his car crushed tomorrow got back behind the wheel after his "third strike".

Police minister Anne Tolley revealed today that the first car to be destroyed under a law aimed at stamping out illegal street racing will be crushed tomorrow in Lower Hutt.

Police this afternoon refused to release details of on the offender.

But Stuff.co.nz understands the racer was disqualified after being convicted for wheel-spinning - and as it was his third strike an order was given to crush the car.

He then got behind the wheel of a car again - and was caught a fourth time. He is now awaiting sentence on that offence.

CRUSHER'S CALL

It has taken four years for a car to be crushed under boy racer laws, but the minister nicknamed "crusher" says things are about to get busy.

National passed the Vehicle Confiscation and Seizure Bill in 2008 - and earned former Police Minister Judith Collins the sobriquet "Crusher Collins".

The law aimed to cut out illegal street racing by requiring a vehicle to be destroyed after a third offence.

Collins today said there were 116 people who had had their second strike.

"The three strike policy we have for car crushing goes through very slowly but it does get there," she said.

At Parliament's law and order select committee today, Tolley said the car to be crushed tomorrow belonged to a "silly young man" who had been convicted of driving offences four times.

Collins said she was very pleased Tolley would be able to oversee the crushing of the first car.

With so many drivers on their second strike, "Mrs Tolley might be very busy".

Previously Milton teenager Karn Clarrie Forrest, 18, was to be the first to have his car crushed after notching up his third offence of wheel-spinning in December last year.

But the action, in April, was halted when police realised his 1982 Toyota Corolla DX had been switched before it could be taken to a Dunedin scrap metal yard.

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