ACC move 'inadequate'

PHIL KITCHIN
Last updated 05:00 30/08/2012

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ACC has made small steps to correct false allegations of blackmail against privacy whistleblower Bronwyn Pullar.

It posted an online "addendum" yesterday to a report by two senior managers about their meeting with Ms Pullar and her supporter, Michelle Boag, in December.

Their allegations that Ms Pullar demanded a guaranteed benefit for two years and threatened to withhold information if demands were not met were shown to be false.

Nonetheless, the report containing the allegations has remained on ACC's website.

Yesterday's addendum said the managers had a “perception a threat had been made” and referred the matter to police to decide if wrong-doing had taken place.

“The police released their finding that ‘no offence has been disclosed' - documents relating to that decision are also available on this website.”

Ms Pullar and Ms Boag said the response was “inadequate”.

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