ACC move 'inadequate'

PHIL KITCHIN
Last updated 05:00 30/08/2012

Relevant offers

Politics

Transport Minister Simon Bridges stalls on electric vehicle policy Paula Bennett: Government not planning to help fund beach campaign Judith Collins: Crushing cars of fleeing drivers could reduce pursuits Prime Minister John Key says Southland is becoming more important to New Zealand's economy MP Tim Macindoe hosts flag referendum debate in Hamilton It's time to ban sunbeds, Consumer NZ says Sparks fly over proposed Marlborough Sounds recreational fishing park John Key turns down Winston Peters' challenge to find a photo of him fishing in Northland Andrew Little: I care about New Zealand too, Mr Joyce A TPP protester's open letter to Steven Joyce

ACC has made small steps to correct false allegations of blackmail against privacy whistleblower Bronwyn Pullar.

It posted an online "addendum" yesterday to a report by two senior managers about their meeting with Ms Pullar and her supporter, Michelle Boag, in December.

Their allegations that Ms Pullar demanded a guaranteed benefit for two years and threatened to withhold information if demands were not met were shown to be false.

Nonetheless, the report containing the allegations has remained on ACC's website.

Yesterday's addendum said the managers had a “perception a threat had been made” and referred the matter to police to decide if wrong-doing had taken place.

“The police released their finding that ‘no offence has been disclosed' - documents relating to that decision are also available on this website.”

Ms Pullar and Ms Boag said the response was “inadequate”.

Ad Feedback

- The Dominion Post

Special offers
Opinion poll

Should the speed limit be raised to 110kmh on some roads?

Yes

No

Vote Result

Related story: 110kmh limit moves closer

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content