Ngati Toa settlement gives islands, haka right

TOM HUNT
Last updated 12:49 30/08/2012
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ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ

EXERCISING RIGHTS: Ngarongo Iwikatea Nicholson at the initialling.

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A Porirua-based iwi will sign a treaty settlement recognising them as the creators of the world's most famous haka.

Ngati Toa are to sign a $75m Treaty of Waitangi settlement which will give them Kapiti and Taputeranga islands, as well as recognition as creators of the Ka Mate, made famous by the All Blacks.

The "initialling" of the settlement in Parliament today marks the beginning of the end of a heated dispute with rival iwi Port Nicholson Block Trust, who yesterday appealed to the High Court to stop today's ceremony.

The $75.335m settlement is made up of financial redress of $40m, $10m to recognise Ngati Toa's maritime domain over Cook Strait, $11.5m for the purchase of commercial property and $6.5m for iwi development.

Ngati Toa will get:

* Rights to Kapiti Island - but this will mostly be gifted back to the Crown. A smaller area on the north side of the island will remain vested to Ngati Toa, but under the management of the Conservation Department. A 1-hectare block will also remain under Ngati Toa's ownership.

* Rights to Taputeranga Island in Island Bay, which Wellington City Council would retain management of, and the Akatarawa Road conservation area.

* Rights to Taupo Urupa in Plimmerton - public access would not be affected.

* Coastal statutory acknowledgements over Cook Strait and Wellington Harbour.

* Statutory acknowledgement over the Hutt River catchment, Red Rocks Scientific Reserve on Wellington's south coast, and Oteranga Bay in Makara.

* A number of Crown properties would be offered for purchase including the Wellington central police station, which would be leased back to police.

* Special legislation recognising Te Rauparaha as the composer of the Ka Mate haka. This would mean if the haka was used commercially, Ngati Toa would have to be identified. Cases where it was not identified could be taken to court but no damages could be sought.

* Several place names will be changed - including Porirua Harbour, which will become Te Awarua-o-Porirua Harbour.

* Statutory acknowledgement and deeds of recognition over lakes Rotorua and Rotoiti in Nelson Lakes National Park.

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- The Dominion Post

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