David Bain: Justice Minister Amy Adams still waiting on compensation report

David Bain continues to wait for the outcome of a second report on whether he should receive compensation for his time ...
BOHDAN WARCHOMIJ

David Bain continues to wait for the outcome of a second report on whether he should receive compensation for his time in prison.

Justice Minister Amy Adams is still waiting on a report about David Bain's compensation claim - several months after it was meant to be done and nearly a year after it was commissioned.

Adams appointed former Australian High Court judge Ian Callinan last March to conduct a fresh inquiry into Bain's claim for compensation for wrongful conviction and imprisonment.

The appointment followed a decision by Cabinet last February to set aside all previous advice about Bain's claim.

Justice Minister Amy Adams commissioned a second review into David Bain's compensation claim in March last year.
KIRK HARGREAVES / FAIRFAX NZ

Justice Minister Amy Adams commissioned a second review into David Bain's compensation claim in March last year.

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Callinan was due to report back last October, but a spokesman for Adams said there was no suggestion the report would be released imminently.

"We're waiting for the report process to be concluded," the spokesman said.

Bain advocate Joe Karam declined to comment when asked about the status of the report.

Callinan was asked to advise whether he was satisfied Bain had proved he was innocent on the balance of probabilities and, if so, whether he was also satisfied Bain had proved he was innocent beyond reasonable doubt.

At the time, Adams said Callinan expected to be able to report back to the Justice Minister within six months.

Bain, 43, was convicted in 1995 of the murder of  five family members in Dunedin on June 20, 1994. He spent 13 years in jail after a jury found him guilty in 1995 and was bailed in 2007 after his convictions were quashed by the Privy Council which found his first trial was a miscarriage of justice. He was then acquitted by a Christchurch jury at a retrial in 2009.

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An inquiry by retired Canadian judge Ian Binnie in 2012 found Bain had proved his innocence on the balance of probabilities but not beyond reasonable doubt.

Judith Collins, the Justice Minister at the time, ordered a review of Binnie's report, saying he had made "significant errors" and went "well beyond" his terms of reference.

 - Stuff

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