PM used as phone scam bait

ANDREA VANCE
Last updated 13:38 10/09/2012

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Phone scammers are using a 'John Key scheme' to unleash malicious software onto victims' computers.

More details have emerged since last week about the fraudsters, who claim to be from Wellington's Inland Revenue Department, telling victims they have been chose to receive money from the fictitious fund.

To claim the fund they must fill in a form and send $149, via Western Union. But when the victim goes online, software is launched onto their computer giving the scammers access to the file.

Consumer Affairs warns there is no 'John Key Scheme' ''. ''If you receive this phone call, put the phone down. Do not send any money, or follow any other instructions the caller may give you,'' the department advised.

A spokesman for Key said: “Consumer Affairs has done the right thing by alerting the public to this scam, and I would encourage anybody who receives such a scam call to follow Consumer Affairs’ advice and put the phone down.”

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- BusinessDay.co.nz

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