Rotary Club pulls pin on Ansell

Last updated 18:28 05/10/2012

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A Rotary Club has distanced themselves from a political activist who claimed the country was headed toward an "apartheid Aotearoa" by cancelling his speech.

John Ansell was set to give a speech at the Rotary Club of Remuera's meeting on Monday as part of his Treatygate/Colourblind State campaign.

Ansell has claimed the Treaty of Waitangi was an exercise in "mass brainwashing with false history" by the successive New Zealand governments.

Ansell's campaign was aimed at exposing the "Treatygate fraudsters and for the government to create a colourblind state".

The former marketing manager for the ACT party first came under fire after he was forced to step down in July last year after he said Maori "have gone from the stone age to the space age in 150 years and haven't said thanks".

Rotary Club of Remuera president John Burrows said the organisation was firmly "non-political" and media hype had seen the club "ambushed" into providing a platform for Ansell.

Ahead of Monday's meeting, Burrows today said Ansell had "stepped over the mark" after issuing his own invitation to members of the public and promoting his talk at the club as a "state launch".

"There is no way that the Rotary Club of Remuera endorses John Ansell's views, or that it ever wanted to give him a platform to launch his political aspirations," said Burrows.

"We might invite him to talk to us in the future. As business and thought leaders Rotarians like to be informed. But he will be just one of a variety of people, including politicians, which we invite to share their ideas.

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- Auckland Now

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