Today in politics: Friday, November 23

Last updated 05:00 23/11/2012

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Politics

When the river runs dry: The true cost of NZ water The immigration debate: Please leave your logic at the border A brief glossary of terms politicians use in the immigration debate Maori land reform bill continues to divide Mana and the Maori Party despite a promise to work together NZ's net migration gain still at record highs near 72,000 as arrivals continue to climb Reserve Bank promotes Geoff Bascand, possible future governor, to deputy chief executive Ilam candidate Raf Manji questions how incumbent Gerry Brownlee can juggle roles NZ immigration flows unlikely to slow despite Government's changes: ASB War veteran's epic pension fight has taken its toll, the 80-year-old's daughter says Nick Smith reflects on 'small reduction in responsibilities' after cabinet reshuffle

Winning selections a pure coincidence

National MP Eric Roy suggested it was a flaw of our human rights laws that they did not define discrimination. Human rights chief commissioner David Rutherford said it was usually left to common sense. New Zealand did not, for example, have a legal exemption to allow selection of players on national sports teams to be picked based on nationality.

Labour MP Ruth Dyson: "I actually thought we did that so we'd be able to have a lot of Pacific Islanders and win."

Environmentalist 100% pure grinch

Wellington corporate lobbyist Mark Unsworth has lashed out at Mike Joy, who criticised New Zealand's environmental record in a New York Times article about the 100% Pure tourism campaign.

In a letter to Dr Joy, Mr Unsworth accused the water scientist of having an ego "so great" he felt the need to "sabotage all the efforts made by those promoting tourism". Dr Joy should change his name to "Dr Misery", he suggested. Ouch!

Demoted Cunliffe's team demanding answers

David Cunliffe's New Lynn electorate committee has decided to lay a complaint over his demotion and the comments made about him by other MPs within the caucus. Electorate committee member Greg Presland said there was deep concern about what had happened. The committee also voted unanimously in support of Mr Cunliffe. The committee's move came calls from leader David Shearer to "move on".

Scratched Key still boss of the links

Prime Minister John Key's South East Asia tour has had its ups and downs. He is sporting a nasty bump and scratch on his forehead after hitting his head on a desk while bending over to unplug his cellphone. "It hurt like hell, I was seeing stars," he said.

But a big plus was the dawn round of golf squeezed in with Trade Minister Tim Groser in Cambodia on Wednesday. Mr Key won, pointing out it would be "a career-limiting move" to beat the boss.

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- The Dominion Post

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