Today in politics: Saturday, November 24

Last updated 05:00 24/11/2012

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Politics

No rest for Key as schedule heats up Labour's Steve Gibson takes swing - at Cunliffe Labour leadership contest likely Beehive Live: Now the work begins Death throes, low blows, election night had it all Labour's leadership contenders Shuffle ahead for National Kiwis could vote on flag next year Oldest candidate may run again in 2017 Labour message off mark, MP says

KEY GETS TOP OF CLASS

Prime Minister John Key, famous for his "Keyisms" – or linguistic twists – surprised everyone during his trip to Myanmar this week by getting the names of President Thein Sein and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi down pat. Even the usually polished Barack Obama struggled with the lingo; the American president repeatedly got Suu Kyi's name wrong, and also incorrectly addressed Thein Sein. Maybe it's only the Kiwi lingo that trips up our prime minister. 

DEEPER DIGGER LIKELY ON MINING FACT-FINDING TOUR

 

The Government will step up its push for more mining when Finance Minister Bill English heads to Queensland and Western Australia tomorrow. The trip is being labelled a fact-finding tour but with a delegation of business people on board the Government also looks to be touting for investors. With unemployment stuck at historic highs and tax revenue slumping, it’s no wonder it is pinning its hopes on mining giving it the Midas touch.

KOREAN WAR VETERANS TO ATTENDS COMMEMORATIONS

Up to 30 veterans will be funded by the government to attend the 60th anniversary commemorations of the Korean War Armistice next July, Veterans Affairs Minister Nathan Guy says.  New Zealand was one of the first countries to provide support for the Korean War (1950-53), with 4700 personnel serving in Kayforce and a further 1300 naval personnel also involved. In the seven years New Zealand was involved in the conflict 45 personnel lost their lives.

 

CONCERN EXPRESSED OVER MINISTER'S TURN OF PHRASE

Waiariki MP Te Ururoa Flavell has taken a swipe at Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce after he referred to a group as having ‘‘really gone off the reservation’’. Mr Flavell said the Maori Party had been fielding concerns about Mr Joyce’s use of the phrase, which was offensive to Native American tribes because of its origins in the late 1800s, when many tribes were forcibly relocated from their ancestral homes to ‘‘reserved‘‘ land.

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- Fairfax Media

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