Greens want wider political movement

ROB KIDD
Last updated 15:28 27/01/2013
Metiria Turei
The Greens want to use links built during the anti-asset sales campaign.

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The Green Party used their "State of the Planet" address today to launch what they say will be a new way of campaigning.

Party co-leader Metiria Turei confessed to a couple of hundred people at the foot of Mt Eden that she had previously spent a lot of time at the site for parties and picnics, as well as some "late-night frolicking".

But she was all business today as she issued a call to arms against the Government.

The first priority for the year was to get the remaining signatures needed to force a referendum on the asset-sales issue.

"We will offer a stinging rebuke to this policy when we vote," Turei said.

The Greens hope to use that anti-asset sales momentum to build a "political on-the-ground movement ready to take different kinds of action".

The "I'm in - for the future" plan, launched today, seems to be an extension of the party's "Asset Keepers" - where more than 3000 people signed up online to actively work against asset sales.

"It's modern campaigning," Turei said after delivering her speech.

"It's what it looks like in the 21st century."

Russell Norman, who made a brief appearance on stage too, said the Greens did not have the financial clout of National but it was about putting "bodies on the ground".

Turei also took the opportunity to put the boot into Government inaction on child poverty and said schools had never felt so unsupported or threatened as they did now.

"If the Government keeps attacking schools and kids, they've got a fight on their hands."

A major issue in Auckland was the CBD rail link, which despite being backed by council, had not progressed.

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