Today in politics: Friday, February 8

Last updated 05:00 08/02/2013

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Politics

Adviser steps forward in defence of Collins Hot NZX debut forecast for Genesis Labour will revive R&D tax credit Shock news: Greens now favour privatisation Dotcom threatened John Key, MP says Judith Collins dubbed 'minister of corruption' New Zealand productivity still lags Genesis investors face scaling back Kiwis urged to fight for rights in Australia NZ urged to act quickly on tobacco bill

New Zealand opens wallet to help Solomon Islands

New Zealand has provided $200,000 to the Solomon Islands after Wednesday's earthquake and tsunami and will consider further assistance later. Foreign Affairs Minister Murray McCully said it would probably take some time for the Solomon Islands Government and relief agencies to gain a full picture of the damage.

The $200,000 would go towards humanitarian supplies and Solomon Islands Government assessment teams.

Round 2: All eyes on Peters v Carter

New Speaker David Carter will be put through the mill when he controls his first Question Time next week, and it is likely NZ First's Winston Peters will be even more of a handful than usual.

Mr Peters unsuccessfully sued Mr Carter for defamation over comments about the 2004 scampi inquiry. "I took him on," Mr Carter said, "and the action was struck out.

But does he think the hatchet has been buried? No. I don't think I have really spoken to him since."

Parata fronts up in Christchurch

Education Minister Hekia Parata has been dogged by controversy over the Christchurch school closures and mergers plan and the Novopay fiasco. Today she will have the chance to confront both her demons during a visit to several Christchurch schools.

On her programme is a look at new classrooms at Clearview School in Rolleston, a visit to the site of the planned Pegasus school and a call at Beckenham School to view quake repairs.

Groser not afraid to blow own trumpet

If Tim Groser fails to become head of the WTO, it won't be for lack of modesty. Speaking in Geneva last week, he said the director-general must be "deeply articulate, persuasive" with high personal credibility.

Asked how a politician would avoid becoming partisan, Mr Groser said: "If you asked any New Zealand journalist, they would say, no, no, Tim is the least partisan politician in New Zealand. I have no problem on that front in terms of credibility."

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- © Fairfax NZ News

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