Nuk Korako defends 'lost luggage' bill, but opposition vocal in their ire

Winston Peters was vocal in his insistence the bill was mis-using parliament time.
CHRISTEL YARDLEY/FAIRFAX NZ

Winston Peters was vocal in his insistence the bill was mis-using parliament time.

The controversial "lost luggage" bill was defended during question time on Tuesday afternoon, but members of the opposition remain unsatisfied with the attention it's been given.

The Bill would replace what list MP and submitter of the bill Nuk Korako described as "archaic, prescriptive and not fit for purpose" legislation, which requires airports to publish lost property in local papers.

The amendment would see lost property notices posted on internet forums.

Korako conceded on Tuesday "there are more pressing things" - but insisted he had no control over the timing of the bill.
Richard Cosgrove

Korako conceded on Tuesday "there are more pressing things" - but insisted he had no control over the timing of the bill.

 Korako conceded on Tuesday "there are more pressing things" - but insisted he had no control over the timing of the bill.

READ MORE:
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Indeed, these bills are - literally - pulled out of a cookie tin, leading Simon Bridges to label the oppositions "cookie monsters" for attacking the bill on the grounds of it being "trivial".

The Bill has come under scrutiny for being a seemingly inconsequential order being given an undue amount of resources.

 National's suggestion that the bill be moved to an immediate third reading was vetoed by Winston Peters, who was vocal in his insistence the bill was mis-using parliament time.

"It should not have taken up any of parliament's time in the first place," Peters said.

"It's a total waste of parliament time, it should be dealt with under other legislation."

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Peters claimed he objected to a third reading so an urgent debate surrounding Havelock North's gastro outbreak, "a greater priority," could be held. 

He also suggested that the bill was given to a "token member from Christchurch... because he's got nothing better to do".

When asked "who has put Nuk up to this", Peters replied "whoever is involved in this they've lost the plot."

The bill, at this stage, not going to be passed in an 'omnibus' bill and will be debated on its individual merits.

Allegations have surfaced of Government stacking the ballot with proposed bills to prevent opposition bills from being drawn.

Labour leader Andrew Little has previously described the tactic as an "abuse of process."

 - Stuff

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